Blog

  • Brandless:  Disrupting Everything in Consumer Packaged Goods

    “Make it simple, but significant.”  – Don Draper, Mad Men, 2010 I am excited to announce our recent investment in Brandless, a bold new consumer packaged goods (CPG) company that officially launched today.  Brandless’ mission is simple but significant: offer health-conscious products at a disruptively low price point that can’t easily be replicated by established CPG conglomerates.  Over the past several decades, consumers have grown to believe that…

  • Why Table Stakes Matter in Manufacturing Tech: Our Investment in Tulip

    Last summer, as a guest of a large industrial conglomerate, we took a week in steamy August to visit several factories—including power and lighting facilities in the Carolinas. We expected to see factories exemplary of the future manned by robots and fully automated with digital screens and wearable devices.  At NEA, we’ve invested in several companies that are relevant within these environments including Upskill, which offers a platform for leveraging wearables in the…

  • Deciphering the Current Wave of Cybersecurity Venture Capital

    The current wave of venture investing in cybersecurity took off in 2012, catalyzed by three major IPOs: Proofpoint, Splunk and Palo Alto Networks.  As is typical, big exits in a space significantly increase investor confidence and drive up supply of capital as additional investors rush in hoping to find the “next big thing.”      2013 saw another major exit with the “eye-popping” IPO of FireEye. It also became the year that cybersecurity…

  • Guest comment: a plea to President Trump

    *This piece was originally published by The Washington Business Journal In 1977, an investor named Richard Kramlich met a young man who wanted to develop and sell something most people had never heard of: a personal computer. Mr. Kramlich made a small investment in the fledgling enterprise — an early example of the formidable instincts that would make him one of the world’s most successful venture capitalists. The outcome was extraordinary, by any measure. The man (Steve…

  • Innovation Physics: Part 2

    Note: This post is continued from Innovation Physics: Part 1. The technological “abilities” described in this post are emergent phenomena of the “tools” described in the prior piece. If you haven’t read Part 1, it can be found here. This post is dedicated to Harry R. Weller. We worked together in framing it and writing it for over two-and-a-half years. The contents are largely his vision, which informed his investment decisions for over a decade. I learned an…