Blog

  • SaaStr Podcast Episode 171

    I recently connected with Harry Stebbings of SaaStr to chat about the evolution of opensource software. We covered developer demand, business modeling, founder conviction, market appeal and more. Check it out HERE.

  • CoEdition: Pioneering the Fashion Revolution for Women Sizes 10+

    At NEA, we’ve seen the power of marketplaces that transform industries where supply and demand have historically been mismatched. The plus-size women’s clothing market represents one of the greatest underserved segments in fashion and ecommerce today.  I first became interested in who was solving the challenges in this market when I learned this: 67% of American women are plus-size, but only 18% of all apparel purchases are plus-size. That means two out of every three American…

  • Smartcar: Driving a New Standard for Automobiles

    It may come as no surprise that we at NEA are big fans of APIs (see MuleSoft and Plaid examples). APIs have become the fundamental backbone of every business as the technology helps cut costs, lower barriers to entry, and brings new products to market faster. Over the past decade we’ve witnessed an explosion of connected devices – from phones to homes and everything else in between – creating a fertile ground for app development. At NEA, we've been searching for the…

  • Fishing Scheme: Artificial Intelligence for an Authentic Solution

    At NEA, we are constantly on the lookout for talented entrepreneurs, and unique applications of innovative technologies. Sometimes we are fortunate enough to find both in the same place—as we did with Bryton Shang and Aquabyte.   Today, we are thrilled to announce our investment in Aquabyte, a startup applying computer vision and machine learning models to optimize fish farming efficiency. My partner Greg Papadopoulos and I are leading this investment on behalf of NEA. Having a…

  • You Should Make an App for That

    I remember listening skeptically to a talk at MIT by a young Mitch Kapor describing how he was going to take on VisiCalc with an even better “graphical spreadsheet” that was going to be so fast and expressive that people would go beyond way bookkeeping and “build really interesting models and do all kinds of business analysis.” It was late 1981—IBM had just introduced its first PC to compete with the Apple II—and just a few months later, Mitch and Jonathan…